Red Moon Tee

With the completion of my Red Moon Tee, I believe I just finished knitting the most brightly colored sweater I’ve ever made. It is so fun!

PROJECT BREAKDOWN

Pattern: Red Moon Sweater by Born and Raised Knits

Yarn: Kindred Red Rad Sock in the colorways Willow’s Sweaters and Roarange

To view my Red Moon tee project page on Ravelry, click here.

The yarn is from Kindred Red, a dye shop run by the brilliant Amalia, whose eccentric style produces some of the most vivid and colorful yarns out there. Over the years, I’ve had a hard time getting my hands on her highly desired yarn, but with the start of the Red Moon KAL I was lucky enough to receive one of the beautiful kits she assembled for the knit-a-long. The colorways are Willow’s Sweaters (the pink bubblegum with orange streaks, perfectly arranged blue speckles, and small hints of green and yellow) and Roarange (the obviously rich red-orange–this name is so fitting). The yarn is all on her Rad Sock base, which I have to say is one of the best sock yarn bases I’ve ever worked with. I couldn’t quite put my finger on why–something about the spin, the feel and the resulting knit fabric–but there you have it.

The Red Moon Sweater is a design by Rachel of Born and Raised Knits. It is incredible! My favorite part is the faded moons, which for my tee should be in the back, but I reversed it and put them in front because, again, they are my favorite. There are spread out faded moons in the back as well, as seen below.

My neckline turned out pretty loose, so I may pick up stitches in the Roarange color and bind off to help tighten it up a bit. I actually love the slouchiness and swooping neckline, but a tighter neckline would help the colorwork stand out better, so we will see. I have a hard time making decisions like these.

Below is a complete list of the mods I made:

  • As mentioned above, I am wearing it in reverse, with the front in back and the back in front, because I like the colorwork for my size better in the back.
  • I skipped the a-line increases of the body and knit solid for 8 inches (from the sleeve separation to the start of the bottom colorwork).
  • After the bottom colorwork section I knit 3 rounds in MC, knit 1 round in CC, purled 2 rounds in CC and bound off in CC.
  • For the sleeves, I knit 8 rounds in MC, knit 1 round in CC, purled 2 rounds in CC and bound off in CC.

As the light started to fade, the photos got even moodier. My husband’s photography game has greatly improved over the years, and I think that the Red Moon photo session went particularly well. He is just amazing at everything he does!

Despite the horrible drought we’ve been having here in Alabama in late summer and early fall, the flowers and other plants down by the river looked astonishingly beautiful. Sometimes nature surprises me with its resilience, though I know it is fleeting.

I think I said it before with my Rift Tee post, but this will surely be my last knit tee of the year. I had no way of knowing that after finishing my Rift we would later experience record heat for the start of October. It’s so awful, but it worked well for helping me produce this lovely, eye-catching tee.

Halloween, here I come!

To purchase the Red Moon sweater from the Born and Raised Knits’ Ravelry shop, click here.

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